CPP unequivocally the credible alternative to redeem the country – Nana Kumankuma

Nana Akosua Frimponmaa Sarpong Kumankuma, Chairperson and Leader of the Conventional People’s Party (CPP), has stated unequivocally that the CPP is the credible alternative party to redeem the country from the social-economic dungeon we have been plagued into. ‘Election 2024 is the moment for the redemption of the country from the bad economic policies of the New Patriotic Party (NPP) and its co-partner, the National Democratic Congress (NDC). ‘There is nothing different between the NPP and NDC; the two parties have nothing more to offer the nation; Ghanaians must now rally behind the CPP for the redemption mission,’ Nana Kumankuma told the Ghana News Agency in an interview in Tema. The CPP National Leader said the party is re-organising to face the two main political parties in the 2024 general election, stressing that both the NPP and NDC have woefully failed Ghanaians, especially the youth and women, and brought untold hardship on them. She said the two parties under the fourth republic have pursued socio-economic policies that have been to the detriment of our own people. Nana Kumankuma noted that the effect of the International Monetary Fund (IMF) and World Bank-prescribed policies had led to an unbridled domestic economy and the inability of governments to shape the future in accordance with needs and aspirations. ‘These policies have brought hardship and suffering to our people; their levels of deprivation and poverty have multiplied in several folds, thus resulting in dislocations in many aspects of our national life and thereby threatening national cohesion and stability,’ she stated. She said that in spite of agitations and protests from civil society and the trade unions about the general economic situation and the suffocating effect of petroleum products, the government had refused to change the direction of economic policy to bring relief to millions of Ghanaians. Nana Kumankuma, who is aspiring to contest for the CPP Flagbearer slot for Election 2024, stressed that the reason why the party had performed badly in electoral politics since 1992 was because it was fragmented and disunited. She said, ‘History has it that voters all over the world have rejected fragmented and divided parties, so the current crop of leadership of the party is working towards embracing all groups in the party through its reo-rganisation efforts to present a formidable team for next year’s election.’ The CPP National Leader said no right-thinking person would invest in a splinter party as politics is based on perception and ‘winnability is what everybody yearns for.’ ‘The CPP has tremendous goodwill from the people; therefore, we must prepare adequately to respond to the nation’s bleeding and crying for salvation,’ the CPP Election 2024 Presidential Hopeful stated. Nana Kumankuma, therefore, called on CPP members across the country to unite and build a strong united front, as at this critical state the unity project is sacrosanct and non-negotiable, adding that this will catapult the party to win Election 2024.

Source: Ghana News Agency

Ghana needs adequate technical support of CSOs in HIV response – UNAIDS

Mr Hector Sucilla Perez, the UNAIDS Country Director, has called on Ghana to ensure adequate technical support to civil society organisations (CSOs) to disseminate strategic information, as the game changer in the national HIV response. He said strategic information is the foundation of the development of national HIV policies, plans, strategies, and programmes which unite diverse stakeholders around a set of agreed goals, targets, and strategic directions. Mr Perez made the call at the opening of a three-day training workshop on the Integrated Biological Behavioral Surveillance Survey (IBBSS) to empower CSOs to support HIV response in the country. The training was organised by the Ghana HIV and AIDS Network (GHANET) in collaboration with the Civil Society Institute for Health West and Central Africa (CSIH WCA) on the theme, ‘Role of CSOs in Integrated Biological Behavioral Surveillance (IBBSS).’ It is aimed at building the capacity of CSOs on the IBBSS to be able to use the data for proper planning and advocacy. IBBSS is a community-based systematic survey designed to assess risk behaviors and the prevalence of HIV and other sexually transmitted diseases among the most-at-risk populations, to improve tracking of the HIV epidemic and program planning The workshop, with support from UNAIDS, seeks to empower activists through strengthening their advocacy, influencing, and campaigning skills to support HIV response by using evidence and strategic information for action and change. The Country Director said empowerment of CSOs and communities through this kind of initiative enhances the coordination, accountability, and coherence of efforts in the national HIV response. He said CSO partners and communities of persons affected by the epidemic must understand and use strategic information to ensure that the AIDS response was as focused and effective as possible. ‘Our national response to the HIV epidemic must always consider the ‘Know your epidemic, know your response’ approach. ‘I am confident that the results of this effort will provide critical knowledge and tools to CSOs, communities, and activists to enhance their work on campaigning and advocacy for HIV response,’ Mr Perez started. He said even though Ghana was making progress in many indicators as many other countries, there was the need to accelerate efforts at the country level towards the attainment of the 2030 target. Dr Stephen Ayisi Addo, the Programme Manager for the National AIDS/STI Control Programme, and Consultant of the training said the last IBBSS conducted in 2019 revealed that 18.1 per cent of the HIV prevalence was amongst men who have sex with men compared to the population prevalence at workplaces. ‘It has been a while since then, so we need to repeat it to know whether all the interventions crafted needed to be expanded upon,’ he added. Dr Ayisi Addo said last year the National AIDS/STI Control Programmme in collaboration with the School of Public Health University of Ghana, initiated an IBBSS for key populations and data had been collected. ‘In a few days, the results of the findings will be made public, hence the training to build the capacity of CSOs to enable them to understand the value of the data to effectively react and communicate to others to inform the set of programmes they craft. All of this is to help achieve the 95-95-95 target and end HIV epidemic control by 2030,’ Dr Ayisi said. The target aims to diagnose 95 per cent of all HIV-positive individuals, provide antiretroviral therapy (ART) for 95 per cent of those diagnosed, and achieve viral suppression for 95 per cent of those treated by 2030. Mr Ernest Ortsin, the President of GHANET, urged participants to take the training seriously to enable them to come up strong advocacy strategy when the IBBSS data was finally made public. Mr Evans Adofo, the Director of SALL-Liberia and Member of CSIH WCA, called on countries in the region especially Ghana to enhance strategies to ensure new HIV infections were reduced.

Source: Ghana News Agency

Disregard for injunction application amounts to contempt- Law lecturer

Mr. Albert Gyamfi, a law lecturer and author of legal texts, said that disregarding an injunction application amounted to contempt.
He noted that once an injunction application has been filed and the parties are made aware of it, any action by the respondent that is likely to hinder the fair hearing of the application constitutes contempt.
Mr. Gyamfi cited the case of The Republic v Bank of Ghana and Others; Exparte Dufour, in which the Supreme Court held that when a court is seized with authority to hear a matter, nothing should be done to usurp the judicial power vested in the courts by Ghana’s constitution.
‘Once you are served with an application for injunction, the law behooves you to stop whatever you are doing.
‘If you do any act that turns out to undermine the authority of the court, that amounts to contempt,’ he said on a JoyNews television show ‘The Law with Samson Lardi.’
The programme, which was hosted by a private legal practitioner, Samson Lardi Ayenini, sought to educate the public on the intricacies of the law and its application in Ghana.
The discussion, which dealt with injunctions, their meaning, and legal effects, arose from the legal dispute between the Ghana Police Service (GPS) and the Democracy Hub, organizers of the ‘Occupy Jubilee House’ protest.
The GPS had gone to court to seek an injunction against the protest organizers after they notified the police of their intention to picket the Jubilee House, the seat of government, on September 21-23, 2023, to demand for economic reforms.
Despite the injunction application, the protestors carried on with their demonstration, resulting in 49 arrests.
Explaining why one must cease action after being injuncted, Mr. Gyamfi said one must comply so that the situation before the court is preserved until the court issues its verdict.
He further stated that complying with an injunction was a means of demonstrating respect for the court.
Mr Gyamfi also stated that the law does not require that one be served with the application before compliance.
He said that once the party is made aware, it must discontinue any conduct that could be considered disrespectful to the courts.
‘The law says that once you are aware of an injunction application pending before a court, you cannot do any act that will interfere with that application that is to be heard,’ he stated.
Mr. Bobby Bandon, a law lecturer who took part in the discussion, said, ‘it is advised that you hold your horses until the court determines it (injunction application) so that you are not seen to be taking judicial power into your own hands.’
According to Article 125 of the 1992 Constitution, judicial power is vested in the judiciary; consequently, anything that undermines the judiciary’s authority is regarded as eroding its authority.
Mr. Banson did, however, point out that there are instances where parties can weigh the consequences of disregarding injunction applications and proceed to act.
On whether or not a party must be served before complying with an injunction motion, Mr. Banson stated that it was critical that a party be served.

Source: Ghana News Agency