Officials of Immigration and Customs bust largest consignment of Indian Hemp


A joint Ghana Immigration Service (GIS) cum Custom Division of the Ghana Revenue Authority (GRA) have intercepted 6,400 slabs of suspected Indian hemp.
The consignment, packed in 80 bulky sacks with each containing 80 slabs, weighing about six tons is the highest interception in the area and region.
Nyive Sector Commander, ACI Alhaji Abdulai Zakaria, briefing the Ghana News Agency, said on September 7, 2023, a joint operation led by him and his counterpart Superintendent Courage K. Amegbe, of Operation Calm Life at the border intercepted the consignment upon a tip-off in a dilapidated house under renovation.
He said the house in question is behind the clinic at Atikpui with a digital house number E519, Asparagus Street (VH-1964-3267).
He said the sacks were packed in two separate rooms at the location with no sign of any occupants at the time of the operation, reason for no arrest.
He disclosed the consignment was conveyed to the main office and subsequently sent to the Customs warehouse, awaiting further directives from Headquarters.
ACI Zakaria indicated that the consignment was destined for neighbouring Togo.
The Acting Volta Regional Commander, Assistant Commissioner of Immigration (ACI) Noah Ahomka Yeboah, in commending his men, used the opportunity to advise cartels in the habit of the illegal business to stop.
He said his men were highly alert and believed with the collaboration with other security agencies to man the frontier and arrest these undesirable elements in the society.
He commended the Custom Division of the Ghana Revenue Authority and other securities for their unflinching support, while thanking the Chiefs and residents of border communities for their collaboration.



Source: Ghana News Agency

Accra as the world book capital: ‘All Ghana a stage’


With titillating titles like ‘The Beautyful Ones are Not Yet Born,’ ‘Dilemma of a Ghost,’ and ‘The Marriage of Anansewa,’ our illustrious literary elders sought to exercise their creative and intellectual rights to tell the stories of Ghana to Ghanaians and the larger world, and their fabled efforts have helped many of the next generation find their voices and identities.
Background
The millennials of today may be blissfully unaware that the late, great Efua Sutherland took her activist and bookish pursuits much further, initially discussing the setting up of an indigenous publishing house in Ghana in the 1950s with academic luminaries like Dr. Busia and Dr. J. B. Danquah.
She eventually put thought into action by incorporating and establishing Afram Publication in February 1973 with the late Prof. Kwabena Nketia, another erudite virtuoso, at Dzorwulu in Accra.
This is aside from her pioneering work in theatre arts at the University of Ghana.
Accra has always been a confluence for ideas and ideals, hosting important conversations and serving as fertile ground for the pollination of opinions and thought.
.E.B Du Bois lived in Accra before passing at 95; Maya Angelou uncaged her creativity in Accra in the 1960s, becoming an administrator at the University of Ghana, a freelance writer for the Ghanaian Times, writing and broadcasting for Radio Ghana, and working and performing for Ghana’s National Theatre, among others.
From Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. to Malcolm X, various thought leaders, activists, and writers forged new paths and sailed new worlds of ideas with Accra as a guiding lighthouse.
UNESCO’s decision
The decision by UNESCO to announce Accra as the World Book Capital for 2023, the 23rd city on the planet to be named so, and only the second city in Africa to receive that honour, is therefore apt, thrilling, and a tad bit challenging.
UNESCO’s World Book Capital designation is a global acknowledgment of the power of books as cornerstones for more inclusive, peaceful, and sustainable societies.
By winning and receiving the baton for a year, Accra and indeed all of Ghana have affirmed their ‘commitment to literacy, lifelong learning, respect for copyright, and freedom of expression,’ values that I personally hold very dear.
Like many avid readers, finding a way through Enid Blyton’s books, Nancy Drew stories, and ‘The Baby-Sitters Club’ series as a teenager. Mind you, reading many of the socially and politically charged books in the African Writers Series, and the latter is what developed in an intrigue for the people on this continent. Then there were Pacesetters also African but more modern and, from a teenager’s point of view, more interesting. The sparkling interest in books had grown into a conflagration by this time.
SEHP’s Literacy Promotion
Having always harboured an enchantment for books and intellectual pursuits when I started the Samira Empowerment and Humanitarian Projects (SEHP) in 2017, a not-for-profit organisation working on literacy programmes and fostering the love of reading was a natural fit.
SEHP, believes strongly in the expression of self through writing and the positively addictive power of books. Over the years, we have run several programmes and projects on literary and educational causes that have shaped the lives of many, from urban to rural areas.
Library-In-A-Box
The significance of education and literacy has remained central to SEHP’s interventions. This is exhibited in various educational projects, including the Library-In-A-Box (LIAB) project, where books and reading materials are provided to school children across the country to encourage and foster positive reading habits.
SEHP augments the government’s efforts at resourcing schools with books under LIAB by partnering international and local organisations such as Book Aid and EPP to provide books in diverse categories to deprived basic schools.
Since 2017, the LIAB project has donated over two hundred thousand books (200,000) to sixty-five (65) basic schools across the country. Recently, SEHP commissioned the Kanda Cluster of Schools’ Model Literacy and Learning Centre, which is fully refurbished and resourced with books and computers.
Basic Education Certificate Examination Revision Project
SEHP also has a Basic Education Certificate Examination Revision Project, which provides final-year Junior High School pupils and teachers in selected districts across the country with support and resources to improve outcomes.
In 2021, the Krachi West district in the Oti Region benefited from the project, with a positively inspiring BECE pass-rate improvement from 31% to 63% in 2022.
This project provides the revision materials to students and also includes a comprehensive training workshop, where Chief Examiners are brought in to train Headteahers and Teachers on essential examination preparation and the best usage of the revision packs.
Samira Bawumia Literature Prize
‘The intervention of which I’m most proud, and with which I hope to gain the most profound impact, is the Samira Bawumia Literature Prize launched in 2020 to challenge aspiring young Ghanaian writers to express their creativity, while sharing their art with the world.
‘Out of this intervention, we hope to unearth and encourage the next Ayi Kwei Armahs, Atukwei Okais, and Yaa Gyasis among others.
‘I was excited to receive 1,629 entries from Ghanaian youth between 15 and 25 years of age in the maiden edition, who shared their diverse experiences of growing up in Ghana through poetry, short fiction, and non-fiction along the theme ‘Everyday Ghanaian Life.’ Out of 1,022 qualifying entries, 30 winners were shortlisted and awarded cash prizes and books, with the top 3 winners of each category receiving laptops in addition.
‘We achieved a major milestone by publishing the winners’ stories in an anthology titled ‘All Ghana A Stage.’ The prospect of having more creative authors in the writing community excites us, as we support homebred writing talents through publishing opportunities, cash prizes, and publicity across print, radio, and digital channels’.
In establishing the Samira Bawumia Literature Prize, it was to give our upcoming griots an outlet. The young talents attended writing workshops by seasoned writers and were given the opportunity to impress their work.
Now in its second iteration, and with the next anthology set to come out before the end of this year, this collection of the voices of young Ghanaians is our contribution to the body of Ghanaian Literature. If our young people are to love Ghana and develop a sense of citizenship and patriotism, they must see themselves in the works they read.
‘A compelling story set in Wli must make them want to go and see the place one day. This is why I take this opportunity to commend those holding up the flag of Ghanaian literature in all its forms: novels, non-fiction, poetry, spoken word, drama, and film, among others. I hesitate to mention names and leave anyone out. They have my unwavering salute and respect’.
Accra as world book capital
The designation of Accra as the World Book Capital could not have come at a better time. While we remember with fondness literary geniuses who have passed on, including the venerable Efua Sutherland, whose centenary is in 2024, and the recent passing of the legendary Ama Ata Aidoo, we seize the opportunity to ask ourselves hard questions about our reading habits, nurturing writers, and the book and publishing industry as a whole.
How can we better foster the love of reading, especially in our young ones, so it becomes a lifelong habit? How do we take advantage of digital technologies to improve access to literary works as well as school texts?
In commemoration of the Accra World Book Capital 2023, we have made the anthology ‘All Ghana A Stage’ freely available to download on the Ghana Library Authority app. ‘All Ghana a Stage’ is an ode to the shared experiences of young Ghanaians, inspired by the theme of the maiden edition of the Samira Bawumia Literature Prize, ‘Everyday Ghanaian Living.’
This collection of poems, short stories, and essays explores themes such as the angst and fulfilment of youthful love, the daily struggles of ordinary Ghanaians, and the culture of our politics, the journey of self-discovery, coming of age in a global pandemic, and fears for the future of our natural environment.
In the course of this year-long celebration, SEHP, like many other literacy and culture CSOs, will work on many projects in conjunction with the City of Accra, the Ghana Library Authority, the Ghana Book Development Council, the Ghana Commission for UNESCO as well as many talented industry players to do public readings, book donations and also give our voices to audio books.



Source: Ghana News Agency

Use International Literacy Day to reflect on child education and learning outcomes


Miss Laura Cristina DelValle, National Director of World Vision Ghana, has called on stakeholders in the education space to use the celebration of the International Literacy Day to reflect on child education and learning outcomes.
She said this reflection might help improve their programmes and policies and contribute to improving Children’s literacy in Ghana.
Mis DelValle was speaking at a breakfast meeting to commemorate the International Literacy Day Celebration on the theme: ‘Promoting literacy for a world in transition: Building the Foundation for sustainable and peaceful societies.’
The breakfast meeting was organised by the World Vision Ghana together with its partners like Worldreader, Accra World Book Capital 2023, Pencil of Promise, UNESCO and Civil Societies Platform on SDG 4.
The Day is celebrated on Friday September 8 every year to raise awareness and concern for literacy problems that exist within local communities as well as globally.
It was founded by proclamation of The United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization, or UNESCO, in 1966 ‘to remind the public of the importance of literacy as a matter of dignity and human rights.’
She said quality basic education equips children with literacy skills for life and further learning and achieving this required support from parents, teachers, and school management, therefore, a child’s education was everyone’s responsibility.
National Director said World Vision in collaboration with its partners and the government through the Ministry of Education and other stakeholders improved child literacy and education outcomes.
Professor Samuel A. Atintono, Principal of Accra College of Education, cited studies that showed Ghana had invested more than several other Sub-Saharan African countries in its educational system with between 8 per cent and 10 per cent of GDP over the last ten years and close to 24 per cent of total government expenditure on the sector.
He said unfortunately, the performance of the sector in terms of quality and learning outcomes had not attained the needed international standards and educational efficiency benchmarks.
He said Sub-Saharan Africa also was reported to have about 30 million school-age children, who were not attending school, more than any other region in the world.
Prof. Atintono called for the conscious efforts of government agencies such as the CEA, Development Partners, Publishers, Writers, NGOs involved in literacy programmes such as World Vision, World Education and Pencils of Promise to work together to improve literacy and drive learning outcomes to provide a transformative change.
‘This you can achieve by using innovative approaches to deliver education and literacy to many out-of-school children, the youth, and adults who have either missed school or desire lifelong learning opportunities,’ he added.
He said over the years, various CSOs and partners had played a vital role in supporting and continuing to support the government to deliver literacy programmes.
Mr Leslie Tettey, Regional Director for West Africa, Worldreader, said they were focusing on the promotion of reading in the home by parents and families.
He said that through digital platforms they were bridging the gap in reading and promoting the culture of reading.
The Regional Director said aged appropriate books were available but what was the challenge was how it was distributed, hence, the need to embrace their digital platforms, which had the books for teachers and students.
He said there should be a deliberate policy to ensure that the country increase in its culture of reading to improve its socio-economic development.
Mr Emmanuel Ntim, Acting Executive Director, Complementary Education Agency, said Literacy remained the ladder that had helped many vulnerable, disadvantaged, and marginalized people climb out of poverty.
He said the commemoration of the all-important Day on THE Country’s educational calendar offered an unparalleled opportunity to remind the public of the importance of literacy as a matter of dignity and human rights.
‘It is interesting to state that efforts are being made towards the transformation of literacy in Ghana, regrettably, recent happenings around the world have hampered the progress of literacy,’ he added.
He said the world could not transition into building sustainable and peaceful societies without the significant role of books and reading.



Source: Ghana News Agency

Association of Christian Counsellors graduates Certified Biblical Marriage Counsellors


The Association of Christian Counsellors (ACC) has held its maiden graduation ceremony with a call on the graduates to assist individuals and couples in decision-making processes and help bring sanity in the society.
The ceremony was held on the theme: ‘Recognising and honouring 2023 outstanding personalities who are excelling in their roles in counselling, marriage and family life,’ at Mankessim in Central Region.
They are Rev. Juliana Yorke of Christian Faith Church, Brightwell Amu Mensah of Jewels of God church, Rev. Elijah Debrah Odoom of Straightway Chapel International, Rev. Paul Baafo Quansah of Calvary Road Baptist Church and Counselor Grace Mawuse Doe of International Christian Gospel Church at Mankessim.
The six months training in Level One Certified Biblical Marriage Counsellors’ Course, saw each of them receiving Certificates, Testimonial and citations from the Association.
ACC is into Counselling, Research, Education and Training, hence the training of Reverend Ministers and other individuals with Biblical Marriage Counseling knowledge to administer in their various churches, communities and homes.
The best Pastoral Counselor 2023 went to Rev. Vincent Michael in charge of Deliverance Assemblies of God Church, while the best Wife and Caring Wife 2023 award was received by Mrs Doris Lamptey.
Fifteen other personalities in Mankessim and its surrounding towns, were also honoured with Counseling, Marriage and Family life excellence awards.
His Royal Eminence, Osagyefo Amanfo Edu VI, the Paramount Chief of Mankessim Traditional Area and Her Majesty Nana Dr Ama Amissah III, Queen Mother of the traditional area, were honoured with the 2023 best Traditional Counsellors Award, and they received citations.
The Officiating Ministers were Rev. Emmanuel Otoo, Coordinator, Association of Christian Counselors, Very Rev. Aidoo Superintendent Minister, Ebenezer Methodist Church Mankessim, Dr Bishop Peter Kojo Sackey, Church of Christ and Very Rev. Prof. Mark Nii Lamptey, visiting Professor, Alpha Internal Theological Seminary.
Rev. Otoo, who made the call further, urged the graduates to ensure they played useful roles in the society, saying they must use the pulpit to expose their members and the public to the importance of counselling.
Osagyefo Amanfo Edu thanked the Association for bringing the course to their doorstep to train Ministers of the Gospel and other members of the public with skills in counseling to support persons in distress among others.
He further urged the graduates to be problem and conflict solving agents through the knowledge and skills acquired in counseling to help create safe and conducive environment for all.
Nana Amissah applauded the association for training the participants to become Biblical marriage Counselors in the society.
She encouraged her members, particularly Family Heads and Ministers of the Gospel in the area to take advantage of the opportunity the Association was offering to enable them handle issues brought before them fairly and without fear or favour.
Earlier at an Excellence awards ceremony at Saltpond, the Best Cross-Cultural Counsellor went to Rev. Emmanuel Otoo, Coordinator of the Association, while best Career Counselor Award was received by Very Rev. Prof. Mark Nii Lamptey, member of the Deliverance Assemblies of God Church in Mankessim.



Source: Ghana News Agency

Volta region has only one architect for all 18 MMDAs – Institute of Architects


Mr. Foster Osae-Akonnor, President of the Ghana Institute of Architects (GIA), has bemoaned the limited involvement of architects in local governance in the country.
While addressing a townhall meeting in Ho as part of activities for the Institute’s 60th anniversary celebration, the President noted that of the 18 Municipalities and Districts and in the Volta Region, only one – the Ho West District Assembly, had a resident architect.
He said the absence of the core professionals within local governance affected effective planning and supervision of the built environment as Assemblies did not have the capacity to check hazardous construction.
‘MMDAs do not have the requisite strength of Architects, and architecture sells a country. The responsibility of architects are limited at the Assembly level, and it constitutes a bigger issue for the built environment in Ghana,’ Mr. Osae-Akonnor stated.
He further the nation’s architects ‘felt left out’ of its development, which resulted in several challenges with structural and service integrity of ‘uncontrolled’ facilities being put up, and thus Assemblies must ensure that that the professionals were part of the permitting process as well as the various stages of construction, including final certification of habitation.
The President of the Institute said most assemblies lacked the capacity to issue certificates of habitation due to the lack of architects and revealed that the Institute was working with the Ministry of Local Government to produce a 10-year strategic plan that would be ‘critically followed through’ to implementation.
He used the occasion to urge architects to seek collaboration with the local Assemblies.
‘Architects must take the initiative and begin to think about planning all the MMDAs. We must come together and plan all the MMDAs.’
Mr Osae-Akonnor called also on the public to encourage the use of professionals for proper planning and a safe and sustainable built environment.
The 60th Anniversary Celebration is on the theme: ‘Architects and the Community,’ and the town hall was attended by traditional leaders, heads of local Government and staff, and civil society organisations.
Local Assembly heads at the meeting said the high-cost service of architects affected their patronage and appealed that the charges and rates were considered.
CSOs present raised concerns over access and other structural allowances for differently abled persons and hoped an enhanced input of architects would address the issues.
They also called attention to the lack of drainage and other requisite facilities for structures in the capital and said Assemblies should welcome the call for collaboration for effective planning.
Mr Augustus Awiti, Volta Regional Coordinating Director, said unplanned cities continues to produce challenges, and, therefore, professionals of the built environmental should collaborate to check the menace.
He said the Region was pleased for the opportunity to set out collaboration with the planning professionals and would ensure effective collaboration to help promote a sustainable environment.



Source: Ghana News Agency

Koforidua Technical University Students encouraged to embrace agripreneurship


Nana Yaw Sarpong Siriboe I, the Akyimpenhene of Asante Juaben Traditional Council and recipient of the prestigious 2022 National Best Farmer award, has organised a mentorship forum at Koforidua Technical University.
It was aimed to inspire and motivate students to consider agriculture as a viable and rewarding profession.
The forum, established as part of the Rethink initiative, was launched by the office of the 2022 National Best Farmer in partnership with the Kosmos Innovation Centre and Ghana Exim Bank.
The aim of this forum is to inspire young individuals to perceive agriculture and the various opportunities it offers along its value chain as more than just a conventional occupation, but rather as a gateway to a multitude of prospects.
The forum on the theme: ‘Opportunities along the Agricultural Value Change’ engaged policymakers and stakeholders to come out with policies to empower the youth and also facilitate easy access to finance.
Nana Yaw Sarpong Siribour, who is the Chief Executive Officer of Siriboe Farms, mentioned that the forum addressed many challenges young people encounter in the sector and also highlights the numerous opportunities inherent in the agricultural value chain.
He said the ‘Rethink Agriculture’ programme was expected to equip the youth with the tools, knowledge, information, education and skills that would not only help sustain agricultural legacy but transform it into a force that drives innovation and economic growth.
He further said it was crucial for him to inspire young people to spearhead the agricultural sector’s transformation even though he was trained an engineer, adding that agricultural sector transformation would not only enhance people well-being but also significantly contributes to the socioeconomic development of a nation.
The honoree Mr Benjamin Gyan-Kesse, the Executive Director for Kosmos Innovation Center, noted that agriculture offered ready jobs and that the programme was aligned with the renewed focus of the Kosmos to fashion out new approaches to agriculture.
He entreated the beneficiaries to take the training seriously to build upon their skills in animal rearing, crop plantation and other agriculture opportunities.
He urged the beneficiaries and youth in tertiary schools not to see agriculture as a venture for the academically poor.
According to him agriculture and agri-business could be a tool to create jobs for the youth and address unemployment challenge facing the country.
He called on the tertiary students in the Eastern region to take advantage of all the chances Kosmos offered them by participating in events such as the Young Agripreneurs Forum since his office is prepared to help them turn what they have learned into a useful environment.
Mr Franklin Owusu- Karikari, Director of National Entrepreneurship and Innovation Programme (NIEP) stated that his office had completed training of over 25,000 applicants in the Youth in Innovative Agriculture Programme under Ghana Cares Obaatanpa Programme.
He said that after going through training and coaching, the shortlisted candidates received financial and technical help.
According to Mr Owusu-Karikari, the programme is part of government’s efforts toward supporting commercial farming and attracting educated youth into agriculture to help ensure food security and to help close the country’s food import substitution gap.
He encouraged the students to venture into agriculture because farming was a business with good returns.



Source: Ghana News Agency

260 female head porters graduate from skills training at Walewale


Two hundred and sixty female head porters (kayayei) from 10 communities in the West Mamprusi Municipality, North-East Region, have received vocational training and starter packs to enable them to establish their own businesses.
They were migrants who worked as head porters in urban areas but returned home due to adverse experiences.
The starter packs (toolkits), which comprised make-up kits, sewing machines, hair dryers, weaving equipment, and electrical and tiling materials, were presented to them at a graduation ceremony in Walewale after the six-month skills training programme.
They were trained in hair dressing, make-up and decoration, and tiling, and passed the National Vocational and Technical Institute (NVTI) Examinations.
The initiative formed part of the Providing Livelihood Opportunities and Support for Kayayei Porters (KAYAPORT) project.
It is a $334,446.12 budget project, which began in 2021, with an estimated amount of GHS400,000 allocated to the purchase of the toolkits.
The Catholic Relief Services (CRS), an international non-governmental organisation, implemented the project, in collaboration with the Navrongo-Bolgatanga Catholic Diocese.
The KAYAPORT project is aimed at providing opportunities for adolescent girls for sustained livelihoods and social acceptance in the municipality.
Certificates from the NVTI were presented to the beneficiaries.
Dr Shannon Senefeld, the Senior Vice President for Overseas Operations, CRS, said the project was in line with one of the organisation’s goals to empower young people to thrive.
Migrants, especially young girls, who worked as ‘kayayei’ faced numerous risks and vulnerabilities, she said, and that the project sought to reverse the trend of venturing into the ‘kayayei’ trade.
The CRS was committed to collaborating for change and ensuring the young girls succeeded through the support, Dr Senefeld said.
She called for collective investments in the young girls to bring out their talents and nurture them to contribute to society’s growth.
Mr Zakaria Yidana, the North-East Regional Minister, said the KAYAPORT was a step to restore the reputation of the north that had been dented with the ‘kayayei’ tag over the years.
He urged members of the municipality to patronise businesses of the beneficiaries to help them to succeed.
Rev Dr Mrs Comfort Asare, the Director, Department of Social Welfare, commended the CRS for equipping young people to be self-employed to impact national development.
She advised the beneficiaries to grasp the opportunity and leverage it for greater achievements.
Miss Fauziya Sulley, a beneficiary, on behalf of her colleagues, expressed gratitude to the CRS for providing them with sources of income as alternatives for the kayayei trade.



Source: Ghana News Agency

MTN Ghana Foundation invests GHc13.5million in Bright Scholarship Programme


MTN Ghana Foundation is committing a total of GHc13.5 to its Bright scholarship scheme.
The Foundation has earmarked GHc2.2 for the 2023 group of awardees.
Mr Selorm Adadevoh, the CEO of MTN Ghana speaking at the presentation ceremony congratulated all the scholarship beneficiaries for being selected for the scholarship scheme.
The Foundation has presented scholarships to the first batch of the 2023 Bright Scholarship beneficiaries in Accra.
Another batch of awards will be presented to beneficiaries in a second ceremony in Kumasi today, 8th September 2023.
This year, a total of 120 students from public tertiary institutions are being awarded the MTN Bright Scholarship for the 2023/2024 Academic year.
The Bright Scholarship seeks to ease the financial burden on students by catering for the cost of tuition, accommodation, laptop and stipend for each semester.
The final set of awards under this scheme will be next year, to complete the 25th anniversary Bright Scholarship Reloaded Awards
He said, ‘I am personally excited to celebrate you for the exceptional potential that you have been blessed with and it is our objective as MTN to support in bringing this potential to fruition through the scholarship scheme.’
The CEO said MTN had a goal as a private sector company in Ghana to support the youth and drive education.
‘If we are going to be relevant as a country in a global marketplace in the future. Our hope is in you, and this is why we do what we do. ‘
Mrs. Mamle Andrews, the Chief Director of the Ministry of Education, who spoke on behalf of the Minister of Education, said ‘I say ayekoo to the MTN Ghana Foundation for the initiative.’
She said the Foundation’s deliberate investment in education, with a special focus on female beneficiaries was worthy of emulation and aligned with the government’s commitment to providing equal access to education for all Ghanaian students.
Mr David Amega, a student at the University of Education, Winneba, who spoke on behalf of the beneficiaries and who is also differently abled, expressed gratitude to the Foundation for coming to their aid.
MTN Bright Scholarship was launched in 2018 to provide financial assistance to needy students in public tertiary institutions.
It falls under the education focus area of the MTN Ghana Foundation, which is one of the three focus areas of the MTN Ghana Foundation.
Aside the Bright Scholarship initiative, the Foundation has over the years, awarded over 1000 scholarships to students from basic school to tertiary level.
Since the launch of the MTN Foundation in 2007, the Foundation has invested in over 90 educational projects across the country.
Some of these projects include the construction of a 600-bed dormitory block for Tamale Senior High School, a multipurpose library at Dansoman, a Telecom Laboratory for GIMPA, a six-unit classroom block for Nhyiaeso basic school, a 3-unit classroom block for Mangoase Basic School, among others.



Source: Ghana News Agency